Parking area at shopping quarter

The car park occupies the backyard of a traditional house in ruins located in the Commercial Area in the centre of Valleseco, one of the most humid municipalities of Gran Canaria. The plot corresponds to the back garden of a traditional house in ruins, where some fruit trees have been preserved. The aim of the project is to create a parking area for cars and bicycles. The functional programme also includes accessible public toilets and a control area that makes use of the available space in the renovated house.

The intervention strategy consists of a flexible-use platform that functions as a parking area during the week and as a street market on weekends. The design consists of incorporating a zigzag perimeter garden ring that resolves the encounter with the party walls and forms the parking spaces. The zigzag shape is ideal both for parking cars and for housing the market kiosks.
The road and pedestrian routes share the same platform, which is made of cobblestones with an open joint for cars and a closed joint for pedestrians.

The “green pores” of the paving are part of a sustainable drainage system that captures, filters and stores rainwater, which is used to irrigate the gardens. The perimeter wall made of wooden sleepers includes bollards, bike racks and electrical connection points. The project components are completed with an autoclave-treated pinewood pergola with a geometry that is both continuous and broken, combining areas equipped with solar panels with areas colonised by climbing plants. The project is committed to the dominant use of materials with a low carbon footprint such as wood and stone.

 

Calvia Coastal & Tourist Development

The municipality of Calvia is situated on the southwest end of the island of Mallorca.

It has nearly 60 kilometres of coastline and it concentrates more than 50,000 tourist beds and as many second homes which totals for more than 50% of the tourist accommodation on the Island. The proposal is based on the geographic system of “cavities” and “convexities” that characterizes Calvia’s coast. The design strategy aims to recover and update the development pattern of the irst tourist settlements where the “cavities” of the coast hosted tourist enclaves while the “convexities” were maintained as landscape reservoirs. This pattern is the basis of the vivid image that characterizes the Majorcan coast, and an example of intelligent and sustainable development of the waterfront. The project also includes a model of sustainable mobility and eight tourist enclaves, each with its own unique identity and tourist proile.

Cenobio Pedestrian Access

The Cenobio of Valeron is a pre-Hispanic granary excavated more than five hundred years ago by the ancient inhabitants of the island of Gran Canaria.

Its difficult accessibility helped to preserve this large pantry from potential raids of plunder and looting. The project aims to connect the 300 meter gap between the car park and the archaeological site along a very sharp slope. The program of uses consists of an accessible pedestrian route, complemented by a control area and an interpretation center at both extremes. The project is resolved by three sections of control coming out from the evaluation of minimum land excavation and three diferent landscape experiences (cultural, panoramic and archaeological). The interchange area is the result of bridging the gap between the three control sections with 3D software.

The different spatial scenarios that the visitor enjoys along the way transform the visits of tourists into a memorable and educational experience.

Arrecife Waterfront & Marina

Arrecife is the capital of Lanzarote (Canary Islands). It has a unique geographical location formed by a group of rocky reefs, puddles and islets that constitute and make its coastal front singular. The most interesting part of its history is the efort to communicate the islets and urbanize the “puddles”. The bridge “Puente de Las Bolas”, built in the late sixteenth century, and the pool of San Gines are some of the best examples to do this.

Our intervention strategy consolidates this pattern of growth along the waterfront and the port. The project consists of the extension of two pedestrian pathways along the coastal front, creating new pools and communicating the existing islets.

The resulting loop generates urban spaces where new uses are placed. The crossings of the loop generate nodes that host kiosks, meeting places and water-taxi stations.

Cicer Plaza

The code “Urban Beach” with which this project is launched, not only codiies but also explains the project’s strategy. The proposed public plaza combines the lexibility of beach spaces along with the comfort levels of urban plazas.

The design consists of an undulating topography that connects the beach with the surrounding streets, located at an upper level. The resulting space integrates pedestrian, urban and beach spaces in a coherent manner. Two indoor boulevards run underground and provide access to other amenities such as a wellness center, beach facilities and a sailing school. The claim “Under the pavers, the beach” perfectly expresses the aspirations of freedom and fun of an entire generation. Our proposal aims to rescue the informality of that beach without sacriicing the comfort of the pavers.

Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Waterfront

The project addresses nearly 40 kilometres of coastline, including east and west sides of the city. It also includes a sustainable mobility system as an alternative to the existing one. The solution incorporates two systems: one functional (heavy traic) and another more oriented to leisure-wise enjoyment (light and public traic). Functional mobility incorporates the existing by-pass and the major existing roads of the city. Leisure-wise mobility favours light and alternative traic, including bicycles, trams and pedestrians.

Ten well-equipped parks are placed along the waterfront, as a result of the crossing of urban and natural corridors. Each park seamlessly combines urban programs and facilities, transport hubs and open spaces. By exploiting the urban possibilities of outdoor living and mass enjoyment of the coast, the project aims to condense and deploy the subtropical potential of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.

Gadeokdo Tourist Island

The Gadeokdo Island is entirely devoted to leisure and outdoor activities, and will become a globally renowned environmentally-sensitive resort city.

The proposed tourist developments are concentrated in three sites, where they share locations with traditional ishing villas that become “development anchors”. The proposed solution emphasizes a transversal occupation of the coast, leaving large empty areas of waterfront as landscape attractions and environmental reservoirs. A set of inland leisure facilities work as alternative attractions to the coastal amenities.

Most of the proposed urban fabric is placed on natural slopes leaving lat land for leisure and agricultural purposes. Buildings and landscape schemes are part of the water management system, working as stormwater channels and collectors. The energy strategy includes also geothermal, wind, solar and hydroelectric sources and it allows a selfsuicient provision of water for 30,000 tourists.

Special-Needs Friendly Pathway

The main aim of the project is to solve the problems of universal accessibility and mobility of club members. The overall strategy is to provide not only a functional solution for people with special needs but to also ofer social inclusion, in a non-segregated space. The project is made up of three components. The irst one is a straight staircase that connects the diferent levels. The second component is a smooth ramp that gives direct and universal access to the facilities and the solariums. The third element is a triangular layout that integrates the walks into the surrounding landscape.
The whole layout ofers a 60 % highly permeable surface that guarantees natural oxygenation and watering of the soil.

Digital Totem for the Canary Islands beaches

The digital totems are smart weather stations that collect and display environmental and local information for tourists and visitors of beaches and waterfronts in the Canary Islands (Spain). They are part of an ICT infrastructural network that celebrates the rooted relationship between the Canary Islands culture and their extraordinary climate.

The design is inspired by the aboriginal ceramic art pieces from the indigenous inhabitants of the islands. This art was based on the worship of the sun god “Magheq”, usually represented through circular shapes and decorative geometric patterns.

The design consists of a digitally fabricated solid wood ring standing vertically with a north-south orientation. The southern face hosts an array of photovoltaic modules that turn sunlight into electricity for phone and e-bike charging. The northern face contains a 1,2 m2 video screen that broadcasts real-time environmental data captured by the totem and useful information regarding tourist activities and services in the area. In addition to its technological and digital features, the totem also provides analogy and material values to attract attention and enrich the pedestrian
urban experience.

The resulting solution celebrates more than five hundred years of the creative relationship of the Canary Islands with the sun. From the marking of the solstices for agricultural purposes and the sun and beach tourism to the more recent challenges of producing sustainable energy with solar panels.